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  • Nickel-Plate-150K-Rouleur05-18-2024 09:008 Registered

    05-18-2024
    09:00
    EST
    05-18-2024
    19:00
    01-09-2024 09:55
    05-18-2024 10:00
    150
    RUSA 100
    Flat
    10:00
    Sunrise at 6:21:49 AM Sunset at 9:00:51 PM
    Ride Leader(s):
    William Watts
    Lydia Trott

    Get me there
    Super 8 Rochester
    209 McDonald Dr
    Rochester , IN 46975

    $5.00
    $5.00

    A scenic 150K route that is perfect for riders looking to complete the Randonneurs USA Rouleur Series and/or build up to a 200K Brevet. Over 90% of the route is on Rail Trails, utilizing the Nickel Plate and Industrial Heritage trails.
    The turnaround control in Kokomo Indiana does not have a food stop (Trailhead), it's recommended that riders refuel at Control 4 on the return leg or at one of the many business on or close off trail in Kokomo.
    Food Stops on or close to route that are not controls:
    Peru-Casey's General Store and various restaurants
    Kokomo-Multiple trailheads with water and restrooms, various gas stations and restaurants 

    *Start is at Rochester Plaza:  151 Rochester Plz, Rochester, IN 46975

    Route Link:  https://ridewithgps.com/routes/46583948

  • The-Limestone-Circuit-400K06-08-2024 00:002 Registered

    06-08-2024
    00:00
    EST
    06-09-2024
    03:00
    01-05-2024 18:07
    06-07-2024 01:00
    400
    ACP 400
    Hilly
    27:00
    Sunrise at 6:15:45 AM Sunset at 9:10:23 PM
    Ride Leader(s):
    William Watts

    Get me there
    Day's Inn
    3445 Jonathan Moore Pike
    Columbus, IN

    $10.00
    $10.00

    Limestone is deeply woven into both the natural world and into the history, economy and social structure of southern Indiana.  Long-time cyclists and film buffs will remember that the team of locals in Breaking Away (1979) were known as the Cuitters.  That's because the townspeople in Bloomington were collectively known by work some of them pursued, as cutters of limestone (in the real-world Bloomington, they are also sometimes known as "stonies").  And, indeed, the limestone of southern Indiana is found in 27 state Capitol buildings, and in structures all over the United States, including skyscrapers in Chicago and Manhattan.  This circuit takes in many of the towns that are important to the limestone trade, including Bloomington and Bedford, and Salem, which gives its name to the kind of limestone found in this area.  And, indeed, whenever you pass over a creekbed or ride by a hill, you are likely to  see the exposed limestone that is so prominent in this part of the world.

    Our ride begins and ends in Columbus, Indiana.  If you have time before or after the ride, it is worth looking around Columbus.  The Irwin and Miller families, who were instrumental in founding and running Cummins, the engine company still located in Columbus, had a very strong interest in modern architecture.  For this reason, they have long paid the architecture fees for public buildings in the city, with the result that Columbus is today a living museum of modern architecture.  Columbus and its architecture are also the subject of a very fine movie, also called Columbus, made by Kogonada and starring John Cho in 2017.

    The beginning of this ride is fairly gentle, with a few rolling hills as we leave Columbus, but nothing too taxing.  At around mile 15, we go through Camp Atterbury, which was a very large military installation established during World War II.  Today, parts of it are still used for military purposes, as you will see from the road, but it has also become a very large wildlife preserve.

    After our first control, in Morgantown, we go through forested areas in Morgan Monroe State Park, including the very beautiful Lower Gap Road.  We take the the scenic Old 37 Highway into Bloomington itself.  Our ride through Bloomington takes us by Courthouse square, and through some of the bustling streets of this University town, including the very popular multi-use trail, the B-Line.

    The serious climbing begins south of Bloomington, as we approach Bedford.  In fact, the most difficult climbing of the route is concentrated between mile 75 and 150.

    After Bedford, we go through Shoals, one of the smallest and most remote county seats in the State, and then into the Hoosier National Forest.  The roads here are beautiful, remote and sometimes sharply inclined upward.

    After we leave the Hoosier National Forest, we go south of Lake Patoka, along roads that become flatter, straighter, and more agricultural in character.  Eventually, we come to Salem, the county seat of Washington County, and we go right by its courthouse.  It's a straight and mostly flat shot from there to Brownstown, another small and remote county seat (Jackson County), and then we make our way back to where we started in Columbus.

    Parts of this route are very remote, but there is seldom more than 25 or 30 miles between services, and we have ten controls pretty evenly spread along the route.  This means that you should be able to resupply yourself with food and water along the route, but it also means that you should take the chance when you get it.  

     

  • Farms,-Rocks,-Forests-600K06-08-2024 06:00None Registered

    06-08-2024
    06:00
    EST
    06-09-2024
    22:00
    01-05-2024 18:09
    06-07-2024 07:00
    600
    ACP 600
    Hilly
    40:00
    Sunrise at 6:15:45 AM Sunset at 9:10:23 PM
    Ride Leader(s):
    William Watts

    Get me there
    Day's Inn
    3445 Jonathan Moore Pike
    Columbus, IN

    $10.00
    $10.00

    Overnight Ride



    This 600K consists of two loops, a 400K and a 200K, both of which start and end at the Day's Inn in Columbus, Indiana.  Riders may choose to sleep between the two loops or ride straight through.

    The 400K loop is identical to the Limestone Circuit 400K, and takes riders through Bloomington, Bedford, Shoals, Salem and Brownstown before returning to Columbus.  The terrain on this part of the ride is quite varied, and includes heavily wooded areas in the Hoosier National Forest and extensive farmland.  There is quite a bit of climbing between Beford and Salem.

    The 200K loop is a rectangular in shape, and goes first to Batesville, then to North Vernon, and then to Seymour before returning to Columbus.  Unlike the 400K loop, this loop is more uniform, and takes in mostly farmland.  Apart from the occasional desccent down to a creekbed and back out, there is relatively little climbing on this route.  It can, however, be quite windy, and, with open farmland on both sides of the road, there is no place to hide.  With very few exceptions the roads on this route are quiet, and away from heavy traffic. 

    There are relatively few services on the 200K loop.  This is especially true of the first 50 miles, from Columbus to Batesville; you will not find any services between the controls.  This is also mostly true of the stretches between controls for the rest of the route.  This means that it will be especially important to stock up at controls, and to have reserves on hand.  And if is a hot day, you will need to get water at every opportunity, and carry as much as you can.

  • Pokagon-300K06-22-2024 06:002 Registered

    06-22-2024
    06:00
    EST
    06-22-2024
    19:30
    01-06-2024 17:50
    06-21-2024 07:00
    300
    ACP 300
    Rolling
    13:30
    Sunrise at 6:04:29 AM Sunset at 9:20:09 PM
    Ride Leader(s):
    Lydia Trott
    William Watts

    Get me there
    Angola/Pokagon State Park
    50 Lane 100 Lake James
    Angola, Indiana 46703

    $10.00
    $10.00

     

    Saturday, June 22nd Pokagon State Park, 300k 6AM

     

    Indiana Randonneurs will host a meet and greet prior to our Tri-State Rides on Friday, June 21st at 7PM at Scoops Ice Cream Shop (ridable distance from Pokagon State Park). 

    The Pokogon 300k starts just outside of Pokagon State Park. The park was originally called Lake James State Park when proposed to be the fifth Indiana State Park in 1925. The name was changed to Pokagon State Park to acknowledge the rich Native American heritage of the state and region. Leopold and Simon Pokagon were father and son and the last two most notable leaders of the Potawatomi. 

    We highly recommend staying at the Pokagon State Park Inn or campground before and after the ride. The state park offers several activities for all ages of kids and adults. Alternatively, riders may choose to stay at a nearby inn many of which are rideable to the start.

    The route first takes riders west from Pokagon past several still peaceful lakes in the early morning hours. As riders head west they will find themselves amongst a tunnel of trees following the Pigeon River. This wildlife area not only contains forested areas but also several millponds and dams. Riders will still find the landscape peaceful with only bird and animal sounds breaking the silence. Riders will follow Pigeon River, which flows westward into the St. Joseph River, all the way to the first control in Howe, Indiana. Howe was settled in 1834 and was originally named "Mongoquinong", a name that the Potawatomi people had given to the prairie in northeastern Indiana. It was later renamed "Howe" after John B. Howe, a local attorney. The Howe Military School, founded in 1884, is the town's most famous attraction.

    Riders will head south passing by several small lakes and streams. Between wildlife areas riders will pass farms many of which are Amish. The southernmost point on this route is the town of Merriam and location of the second control stop of the day. Riders will travel northeast riding past Chain O'Lakes State Park. The park owes much of its surface form and geologic makeup to the action of glaciers during the Ice Age (Pleistocene Epoch). The steeply rolling hills, bogs and interconnected lakes bear witness the massive ice sheets that advanced over and then melted from this part of the Midwest near the end of the Pleistocene epoch between 19,000 and 16,000 years ago. The lakes in this chain are kettle lakes formed when the glaciers were still huge blocks of ice. Rivers of water resulting from melting ice carved the channels, which connect nine of the 13 lakes in the park. 

    Riders will continue to travel east towards the western side of the city of Auburn. Riders may find this section to have the most traffic. From this point on the route is the same as the A Real Doozy 200k. Auburn is proudly known as “Home of the Classics” for their role in the early days of the automotive industry. Keep an eye out as you pass the Auburn Cord Duesenberg Museum, you just may see some classics in the parking lot! 

    Heading northeast, after a short 15 miles, riders will come to the next control in Butler, Indiana. One notable thing about Butler is it was the endpoint of a record setting speed for an American Rail. On July 23, 1966 a New York Central RDC-3, M-497 Black Beetle modified with a pair of jet engines raced from Stryker, Ohio on a straight and flat rail line reaching a top speed of 183.68 mph, a record that still stands today. Riders will briefly ride on the state line before officially entering Ohio and into a 157 acre Fish Creek and Wildlife Area. Riders will weave in and around farmlands to avoid gravel roads as they continue making their way east to the next control. 

    Along the way they will briefly pass through Edgerton, Ohio and ride along the historic U.S. Route 6 which is the oldest, longest, and highest “old” road in the US. Route 6 is 3,652 miles long running coast to coast from Long Beach California to Provincetown, Massachusetts, covering 14 states and reaching a peak of 11,990 above sea level.  At mile 68, riders will encounter their third control in the city of Byran, Ohio and the lowest elevation of the route. Some of us carb loving souls usually opt for Little Caesars garlic bread for a lunch snack and munchies for the remainder of the ride. Byran is known for being home to the Spangler Candy Company, the world’s largest candy cane producer. However, the plants in Byran produce Dum Dum lollipops, Saf-T-Pops, and Marshmallow Circus Peanuts for Spangler. The second well known company is Etch A Sketch which was developed by the Ohio Art Company in town.  

    Heading north, the route takes riders on the only paved roads leading to Michigan. Most of the elevation gain occurs on this selection and riders will feel like it's a never ending steady gentle climb. Entering Michigan, the lakes and streams appear again. The last control is mile 105 in Reading Michigan. The last section of the route gives riders several last photo opts with traditional Amish farmlands, buffalos at the Wild Winds Buffalo Preserve, and passing by multiple lakes and conservation areas, including Marsh Lake Wetland.

     

  • A-Real-Doozy-200k06-22-2024 07:001 Registered

    06-22-2024
    07:00
    EST
    06-22-2024
    20:30
    01-05-2024 18:28
    06-21-2024 08:00
    200
    ACP 200
    Rolling
    13:30
    Sunrise at 6:04:29 AM Sunset at 9:20:09 PM
    Ride Leader(s):
    Lydia Trott
    William Watts

    Get me there
    Angola/Pokagon State Park
    50 Lane 100 Lake James
    Angola, Indiana 46703

    $10.00
    $10.00

    START LOCATION IS AT THE ENTRANCE TO POKAGON STATE PARK

    200K-Please join us for our finale Intro to Rando Series! This 200k has a calmer elevation profile compared to standards, and the hills are all rolling with nothing too steep or tall. This route will take riders through IN, OH, and MI and through small lake towns, Amish communities, farmlands, and wildlife preserves. Most controls are only 20-30 miles apart with the longest 36 miles. This route is an excellent final prep for the Ride Across Indiana in a Day Ride, being one month prior and having comparable mileage to elevation profile. 

     

    Indiana Randonneurs will host a meet and greet prior to our Tri-State Rides on Friday, June 21st at 7PM at Scoops Ice Cream Shop (ridable distance from Pokagon State Park). 

    Route description: A Real Doozy 200k starts just outside of Pokagon State Park. The park was originally called Lake James State Park when proposed to be the fifth Indiana State Park in 1925. The name was changed to Pokagon State Park to acknowledge the rich Native American heritage of the state and region. Leopold and Simon Pokagon were father and son and the last two most notable leaders of the Potawatomi. 

    We highly recommend staying at the Pokagon State Park Inn or campground before and after the ride. The state park offers several activities for all ages of kids and adults. Alternatively, riders may choose to stay at the Ramada Inn, the official start of the ride. 

    The route first takes riders south towards Angola passing the west side of the city, weaving between lakes and streams. Continuing southwest, riders will pass through Ashley, “The Home of Smiley Face”. We promise you won’t miss why it’s called that! 

    Auburn is the next city and the first control stop on the route at mile 29. Auburn is proudly known as “Home of the Classics” for their role in the early days of the automotive industry. Keep an eye out as you pass the Auburn Cord Duesenberg Museum, you just may see some classics in the parking lot! 

    Heading northeast, after a short 15 miles, riders will come to the next control in Butler, Indiana. One notable thing about Butler is it was the endpoint of a record setting speed for an American Rail. On July 23, 1966 a New York Central RDC-3, M-497 Black Beetle modified with a pair of jet engines raced from Stryker, Ohio on a straight and flat rail line reaching a top speed of 183.68 mph, a record that still stands today. Riders will briefly ride on the state line before officially entering Ohio and into a 157 acre Fish Creek and Wildlife Area. Riders will weave in and around farmlands to avoid gravel roads as they continue making their way east to the next control. 

    Along the way they will briefly pass through Edgerton, Ohio and ride along the historic U.S. Route 6 which is the oldest, longest, and highest “old” road in the US. Route 6 is 3,652 miles long running coast to coast from Long Beach California to Provincetown, Massachusetts, covering 14 states and reaching a peak of 11,990 above sea level.  At mile 68, riders will encounter their third control in the city of Byran, Ohio and the lowest elevation of the route. Some of us carb loving souls usually opt for Little Caesars garlic bread for a lunch snack and munchies for the remainder of the ride. Byran is known for being home to the Spangler Candy Company, the world’s largest candy cane producer. However, the plants in Byran produce Dum Dum lollipops, Saf-T-Pops, and Marshmallow Circus Peanuts for Spangler. The second well known company is Etch A Sketch which was developed by the Ohio Art Company in town.  

    Heading north, the route takes riders on the only paved roads leading to Michigan. Most of the elevation gain occurs on this selection and riders will feel like it's a never ending steady gentle climb. Entering Michigan, the lakes and streams appear again. The last control is mile 105 in Reading Michigan. The last section of the route gives riders several last photo opts with traditional Amish farmlands, buffalos at the Wild Winds Buffalo Preserve, and passing by multiple lakes and conservation areas. 

     

     

  • Tri-State-100K06-22-2024 07:001 Registered

    06-22-2024
    07:00
    EST
    06-22-2024
    13:40
    01-08-2024 14:07
    06-22-2024 08:00
    100
    RUSA 100
    Rolling
    6:40
    Sunrise at 6:04:28 AM Sunset at 9:20:08 PM
    Ride Leader(s):
    Lydia Trott
    William Watts

    Get me there
    Pokagon State Park
    450 Ln 100 Lake James,
    angola, IN 46703

    $5.00
    $5.00

    Saturday, June 22nd Pokagon State Park, 100k 7AM

    This road route weaves in and around small lakes and farmlands in Indiana, Michigan, and Ohio. A small detour at mile 39.4 (and a little gravel) riders can stand on the IN, OH, and MI border. We highly recommend checking out Pokagon State Park after your ride with a cool down at the beach or a hike around the marshlands to the hardwood forest up to Hell's Point. The park was originally called Lake James State Park when proposed to be the fifth Indiana State Park in 1925. The name was changed to Pokagon State Park to acknowledge the rich Native American heritage of the state and region. Leopold and Simon Pokagon were father and son and the last two most notable leaders of the Potawatomi. 

     

    Indiana Randonneurs will host a meet and greet prior to our Tri-State Rides on Friday, June 21st at 7PM at Scoops Ice Cream Shop (ridable distance from Pokagon State Park). 

     

  • The-Limestone-Circuit-400K07-06-2024 06:00None Registered

    07-06-2024
    06:00
    EST
    07-07-2024
    09:00
    01-05-2024 18:13
    07-05-2024 07:00
    400
    ACP 400
    Hilly
    27:00
    Sunrise at 6:22:56 AM Sunset at 9:14:36 PM
    Ride Leader(s):
    William Watts

    Get me there
    Day's Inn
    3445 Jonathan Moore Pike
    Columbus, IN

    $10.00
    $10.00

    Limestone is deeply woven into both the natural world and into the history, economy and social structure of southern Indiana.  Long-time cyclists and film buffs will remember that the team of locals in Breaking Away (1979) were known as the Cuitters.  That's because the townspeople in Bloomington were collectively known by work some of them pursued, as cutters of limestone (in the real-world Bloomington, they are also sometimes known as "stonies").  And, indeed, the limestone of southern Indiana is found in 27 state Capitol buildings, and in structures all over the United States, including skyscrapers in Chicago and Manhattan.  This circuit takes in many of the towns that are important to the limestone trade, including Bloomington and Bedford, and Salem, which gives its name to the kind of limestone found in this area.  And, indeed, whenever you pass over a creekbed or ride by a hill, you are likely to  see the exposed limestone that is so prominent in this part of the world.

    Our ride begins and ends in Columbus, Indiana.  If you have time before or after the ride, it is worth looking around Columbus.  The Irwin and Miller families, who were instrumental in founding and running Cummins, the engine company still located in Columbus, had a very strong interest in modern architecture.  For this reason, they have long paid the architecture fees for public buildings in the city, with the result that Columbus is today a living museum of modern architecture.  Columbus and its architecture are also the subject of a very fine movie, also called Columbus, made by Kogonada and starring John Cho in 2017.

    The beginning of this ride is fairly gentle, with a few rolling hills as we leave Columbus, but nothing too taxing.  At around mile 15, we go through Camp Atterbury, which was a very large military installation established during World War II.  Today, parts of it are still used for military purposes, as you will see from the road, but it has also become a very large wildlife preserve.

    After our first control, in Morgantown, we go through forested areas in Morgan Monroe State Park, including the very beautiful Lower Gap Road.  We take the the scenic Old 37 Highway into Bloomington itself.  Our ride through Bloomington takes us by Courthouse square, and through some of the bustling streets of this University town, including the very popular multi-use trail, the B-Line.

    The serious climbing begins south of Bloomington, as we approach Bedford.  In fact, the most difficult climbing of the route is concentrated between mile 75 and 150.

    After Bedford, we go through Shoals, one of the smallest and most remote county seats in the State, and then into the Hoosier National Forest.  The roads here are beautiful, remote and sometimes sharply inclined upward.

    After we leave the Hoosier National Forest, we go south of Lake Patoka, along roads that become flatter, straighter, and more agricultural in character.  Eventually, we come to Salem, the county seat of Washington County, and we go right by its courthouse.  It's a straight and mostly flat shot from there to Brownstown, another small and remote county seat (Jackson County), and then we make our way back to where we started in Columbus.

    Parts of this route are very remote, but there is seldom more than 25 or 30 miles between services, and we have ten controls pretty evenly spread along the route.  This means that you should be able to resupply yourself with food and water along the route, but it also means that you should take the chance when you get it.  

     

  • Farms,-Rocks,-Forests-600K07-06-2024 06:00None Registered

    07-06-2024
    06:00
    EST
    07-07-2024
    22:00
    01-05-2024 18:15
    07-05-2024 07:00
    600
    ACP 600
    Hilly
    40:00
    Sunrise at 6:22:56 AM Sunset at 9:14:36 PM
    Ride Leader(s):
    William Watts

    Get me there
    Day's Inn
    3445 Jonathan Moore Pike
    Columbus, IN

    $10.00
    $10.00

    Overnight Ride



    This 600K consists of two loops, a 400K and a 200K, both of which start and end at the Day's Inn in Columbus, Indiana.  Riders may choose to sleep between the two loops or ride straight through.

    The 400K loop is identical to the Limestone Circuit 400K, and takes riders through Bloomington, Bedford, Shoals, Salem and Brownstown before returning to Columbus.  The terrain on this part of the ride is quite varied, and includes heavily wooded areas in the Hoosier National Forest and extensive farmland.  There is quite a bit of climbing between Beford and Salem.

    The 200K loop is a rectangular in shape, and goes first to Batesville, then to North Vernon, and then to Seymour before returning to Columbus.  Unlike the 400K loop, this loop is more uniform, and takes in mostly farmland.  Apart from the occasional desccent down to a creekbed and back out, there is relatively little climbing on this route.  It can, however, be quite windy, and, with open farmland on both sides of the road, there is no place to hide.  With very few exceptions the roads on this route are quiet, and away from heavy traffic. 

    There are relatively few services on the 200K loop.  This is especially true of the first 50 miles, from Columbus to Batesville; you will not find any services between the controls.  This is also mostly true of the stretches between controls for the rest of the route.  This means that it will be especially important to stock up at controls, and to have reserves on hand.  And if is a hot day, you will need to get water at every opportunity, and carry as much as you can.

  • Riding-the-Rails-400K08-10-2024 06:00None Registered

    08-10-2024
    06:00
    EST
    08-11-2024
    09:00
    01-05-2024 18:12
    08-09-2024 07:00
    400
    ACP 400
    Flat
    27:00
    Sunrise at 6:49:46 AM Sunset at 8:49:39 PM
    Ride Leader(s):
    Ted Krischak
    William Watts

    Get me there
    Hampton Inn Kokomo Indiana
    2920 S Reed Rd
    Kokomo, IN

    Hampton Inn, Kokomo Hotel Complex
    $10.00
    $10.00

    Start/Finish: Industrial Heritage Trail (Southern Trailhead, accessed from Pedestrian Tunnel).  There is an adjacent hotel complex that has a Hampton Inn, Motel 6, Best Western, and Baymont Inn with quite a lot of parking and a convenience store.  

    Trails Used:  Industrial Heritage, Nickel Plate, Sweetser Switch, and Cardinal Greenway 

    Trail Surface and %:  Paved, and about 70% of the route is trails

    Start Time:  0600

    Route Description:

    A very scenic and low-traffic 400K route, primarily using Rail Trails with bike route road connectors between the trail systems. The trails are paved and make up about 70% of the route.
    The route starts in Kokomo, IN and takes the Industrial Heritage/Nickel Plate trail North to Rochester IN. The route then returns South on the Nickel Plate to Cassville, IN before taking a short road route to Converse, IN and connecting with the Sweetser Switch Cardinal Greenway trail system.. This section goes through several towns, including Marion, before taking another short road connector to Gaston, IN and the Cardinal Greenway. Riders will take the Cardinal Greenway to the Losantville turn around. From Losantville, riders will take the same route back to Cassville before heading South on the Nickel Plate/Industrial Heritage Trail to the start/finish in Kokomo.
    Services are readily available at the Controls, as well as the towns the trails pass through. There are also rest stops on the trails (restrooms, shelters, and bike repair stands).

  • The-True-Story09-28-2024 07:00None Registered

    09-28-2024
    07:00
    EST
    09-28-2024
    20:30
    01-05-2024 18:25
    09-27-2024 08:00
    200
    ACP 200
    Hilly
    13:30
    Sunrise at 7:37:32 AM Sunset at 7:32:50 PM
    Ride Leader(s):
    William Watts

    Get me there
    Major Taylor Velodrome
    3649 Cold Spring Rd
    Indianapolis, IN 46222

    $10.00
    $10.00

    The True Story 200K is an out-and back ride from Indianapolis, the capitol city of Indiana, to the small town of Story in Brown County.

    The ride begins at the Major Taylor Velodrome, which is at the heart the Indianapolis cycling community.  The velodrome is named after Major Taylor, an African American professional cyclist who was born in Indianapolis in 1878 and began his illustrious career here.  Marian University, which manages the Velodrome, and is directly across the street from it, has for some time been a powerhouse in collegiate bicycle racing. 

    The first part of the ride hugs the east bank of the White River on Indianapolis’s growing system of trails.  We turn onto West Street at the J. W. Marriott Hotel, a tall building with a blue glass façade.

    West Street leads to Bluff Road, a rough, urban road that is scheduled to be repaved with a bike lane; we will all be thankful when that improvement occurs.  From Bluff Road, we take an oblique left turn onto Morgantown road, which leads us from suburbia to the countryside. The Citgo station, on the left at about mile 20.4, provides the last services on the route for about 24 miles, when we arrive at the control in Bean Blossom.

    After we turn left off of Morgantown Road, we skirt the edge of Bargersville; there are services slightly off the route here, including Tax Man, an excellent brewpub with Belgian-style bears.  We then navigate a number of county roads, with a few steep descents and climbs out of creek beds, and eventually come to Spearsville Road, which takes us into Brown County.  Beginning with the Fall 2023, we will take Bean Blossom Road into Nashville.  This is a quiet and scenic ride, with a two challenging hills, and some good downhill runs.  The second control will be at the very pleasant Farm Hosue Cafe. We then continue onto Grassy Creek Road, and from there to Main Street in Nashville. We pass directly in front of Big Woods at Hard Truth Hills, a brewpub that is a very pleasant place for lunch with ample outdoor seating; it is on your left soon after you turn onto Main Street.  After a short stretch on Highway 46, which has a mercifully wide shoulder, we take Highway 135 along the eastern border of Brown County State Park, the largest and most visited state park in Indiana. 

     

    After some climbing and some twisty roads, we come to Story, the turn-around point.  Story was a village founded in the late 19th-century that declined after World War II and was abandoned in the 1970s.  In the 1990s, it was redeveloped as a hotel and resort.  There is a fairly good sit-down restaurant in the hotel, which is moderately priced, but might take too much time for those who are in a hurry (I usually allow an hour when I eat there.)  In the summer, there is faster and cheaper outdoor dining on the patio.

    From Story, we turn around, and do it all over again. However, instead of taking Bean Blossom Road, we will instead continue on Grassy Creek Road, which will give us the pelasure of climbing Grassy Creek Hill.  The fourth Control is at the Dollar General Store in Bean Blossom.  Bill Monroe, the father of modern bluegrass music, established his annual festival in Bean Blossom in 1951, and that festival and several others have continued there since Monroe died in 1996.  You will see the festival grounds on the left as you approach the control.  

    And, after some climbing and some twisty roads, we come to Story, the turn-around point.  Story was a village founded in the late 19th-century that declined after World War II and was abandoned in the 1970s.  In the 1990s, it was redeveloped as a hotel and resort.  There is a fairly good sit-down restaurant in the hotel, which is moderately priced, but might take too much time for those who are in a hurry (I usually allow an hour when I eat there.)  In the summer, there is faster and cheaper outdoor dining on the patio.

    From Story, we turn around, and do it all over again.

     


Sunrise and Sunset courtesy of Sunrise-Sunset.org